Explore The World’s Most Perilous Bridges And Feel Your Heart Stop

Published on 10/04/2022

Hussaini Hanging Bridge — Pakistan

Borit Lake and the Hussaini Hanging Bridge are located in the village of Hussaini in Northern Pakistan. This footbridge has an erratic gap that exists between the sticks and wooden planks that act as a walking path, so be careful where you step.

Hussaini Hanging Bridge — Pakistan

Hussaini Hanging Bridge — Pakistan

Due to the fact that the Hussaini Hanging Bridge was never built professionally in the first place, it has been destroyed and rebuilt numerous times throughout its history. If you want to make it to the other side, you’re going to need steely nerves!

Mekong River Crossing – China

China, Burma, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam are the six Southeast Asian nations through which the Mekong river flows. The water conditions along the river’s course can vary from calm to raging rapids, based on your location. This image was likely taken shortly after a powerful storm.

Mekong River Crossing – China

Mekong River Crossing – China

It’s fortunate that the man moving along the wires appears to be a skilled slack-liner because falling into the water could be extremely dangerous!

Royal Gorge Bridge — Colorado

One of the most magnificent suspension bridges in the world is the Royal Gorge Bridge in Colorado. The bridge was initially constructed in 1929, spanning 1,260 feet over a rocky canyon. The Royal Gorge lacked stabilizing wind cables for over 50 years, which are now recognized as being essential for a bridge’s structural integrity.

Royal Gorge Bridge — Colorado

Royal Gorge Bridge — Colorado

The bridge was finally redeveloped and equipped with wind cables in 1982. Despite the fact that the Royal Gorge Bridge is now considerably safer, we still don’t suggest looking down!

Millau Viaduct — France

The tallest bridge in the world is the Millau Viaduct. The cable-stayed bridge spans the southern French Gorge Valley and is 1,125 feet above the ground. The bridge is 105 feet wide and more than 8,000 feet long. Building started in 2001 and was completed in just three years.

Millau Viaduct — France

Millau Viaduct — France

The Millau Viaduct was awarded the 2006 Outstanding Structure Award by the International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering and is still hailed as one of the greatest examples of contemporary engineering.

Mystery Bridge — Indonesia

Surfers as well as skateboarders use the “Indo Board” as a tool to practice and improve their balance. In essence, the challenge is to balance a board without wheels on a foam cylinder without letting either end touch the ground.

Mystery Bridge — Indonesia

Mystery Bridge — Indonesia

This Indonesian bridge does seem to be on its very last legs and definitely shouldn’t be used by anyone. Even the most skilled “indo-boarders” wouldn’t fare so well on it. This doesn’t seem to worry these school kids for some reason!

Hanging Bridge Of Ghasa — Nepal

Despite popular belief, both people and animals use Nepal’s Hanging Bridge of Ghasa. Donkeys and cattle pass over the frightening footbridge, which hangs precariously above the river valley, on a regular basis.

Hanging Bridge Of Ghasa — Nepal

Hanging Bridge Of Ghasa — Nepal

The Bridge of Ghasa has been actively used for decades despite its susceptibility to wind and rain. The bridge frequently sways, but those who are brave enough to cross will be protected by its high side rails.

Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge — Ireland

Perhaps the most terrifying hanging bridge on our list is the Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge in Northern Ireland. The 65-foot bridge in the UK attracts thrill-seekers from all over the world who want to cross it 100 feet above the cliffside and rocky shores.

Carrick A Rede Rope Bridge — Ireland

Carrick A Rede Rope Bridge — Ireland

A fisherman who wanted to reach Carrick Island originally created the Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge. This fisherman included just one rope handrail for some reason. Thankfully, there are handrails on both sides of the bridge now.

Sidu River Bridge — China

The Sidu River Bridge is a 4,000-foot-long suspension bridge that spans the Sidu River above the valley in Badong County, China. 1,600 feet, to be exact, separate this bridge from the ground. The Sidu River Bridge, which was built in 2009, was the highest bridge ever built.

Sidu River Bridge — China

Sidu River Bridge — China

In contrast to many of the other structures on our list, the Sidu River Bridge was expertly constructed using contemporary techniques. It’s still a lot of fun to cross, though!

Trift Bridge — Switzerland

The Trift suspension bridge, which spans 558 feet over Swiss glaciers at 328 feet above sea level, is located close to the Swiss Alpine town of Gadmen. When the bridge was first built in 2004, those who dared to cross it on foot noticed a pretty significant problem with it.

Trift Bridge — Switzerland

Trift Bridge — Switzerland

The bridge would violently rock back and forth when it was windy. Stabilizing cables were therefore added in 2009 to reduce the risky swinging.

The Langkawi Sky Bridge — Malaysia

It took until 2005 for this frightening rollercoaster of a bridge to be finished. The Langkawi Sky Bridge in Malaysia actually curves through the mountains of Kedah thanks to its distinctive design. The fact that this 410-foot-long bridge only has one angled pylon supporting it is its most terrifying feature.

The Langkawi Sky Bridge — Malaysia

The Langkawi Sky Bridge — Malaysia

The bridge was closed in 2012 for upkeep and improvement. The bridge was finally opened and deemed suitable for routine use once more in 2015 after being delayed for years.

Mount Titlis Bridge — Switzerland

A pedestrian bridge in the Swiss Alps at a height of about 10,000 feet is only for the most daring thrill seekers. Considered to be the tallest point suspension bridge in all of Europe, the Titlis Cliff Walk. The bridge’s 320-foot length and 3-foot width give visitors the impression that they are walking a tightrope.

Mount Titlis Bridge — Switzerland

Mount Titlis Bridge — Switzerland

We won’t be testing our luck anytime soon, despite the fact that this bridge is said to be able to withstand winds of up to 120 mph.

Vitim River Bridge — Siberia

It’s truly an amazing feat that the Vitim River Bridge is still largely intact considering where it is—the tundra of Siberia. The bridge, which is only 6 feet wide, is made of corroding metal, and the walkway is made of rotting wooden planks.

Vitim River Bridge — Siberia

Vitim River Bridge — Siberia

The regular build-up of ice on this bridge is the most hazardous feature, besides the apparent deterioration. If you decide to proceed, be aware that there are no guardrails and that the bridge wobbles in response to the river’s tide.

Quepos Bridge — Costa Rica

Any bridge that goes by the moniker “The Bridge of Death” or “Oh My God” is unquestionably worthy of inclusion on our list. Along the road that connects Jaco and Quepos, Costa Rica’s central Pacific coast is where you’ll find the Quepos Bridge. It was built as a railroad back in the 1930s.

Quepos Bridge — Costa Rica

Quepos Bridge — Costa Rica

Truck drivers often attempt to cross the narrow pathway despite the fact that this bridge is just hardly suitable for one-way car traffic because they merely have no other options.

Bridge of Immortals — China

Even just getting to the following bridge is a thrilling adventure in and of itself. Eastern China’s mountains are home to The Bridge of the Immortals. One of the most famous historical places and tourist attractions in the entire region is located in the Huangshan, or “Yellow Mountain,” range.

Bridge Of Immortals — China

Bridge Of Immortals — China

Wooden planks that are only a few inches wide and a few rusty nails make up the path leading to the Bridge of the Immortals. It circles the mountain while adhering to the cliff’s edge. options.

Sunshine Skyway Bridge — Florida

Terra Ceia and St. Petersburg are connected by this enormous Florida bridge. Over four miles of Tampa Bay’s waters are above the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, also known as “the Skyway.” The amazing engineering achievement was constructed over the course of five years.

Sunshine Skyway Bridge — Florida

Sunshine Skyway Bridge — Florida

Sunshine Skyway is now referred to as Florida’s “flag bridge.” Due to the Skyway’s incredible height of 430 feet, we strongly advise taking a boat to cross Tampa Bay if you have anxiety about heights.

U Bein Bridge — Burma

Burma’s U Bein Bridge spans Taungthaman Lake. It measures approximately three-quarters of a mile long and was built in 1850 utilizing teak, a tropical hardwood. As you can clearly see, this bridge is incredibly dangerous as there is nothing along the sides to hold onto or serve as support.

U Bein Bridge — Burma

U Bein Bridge — Burma

The U Bein Bridge has also recently developed into a hub for criminal activity. To protect tourists, a small police force is now stationed at the bridge.

Storseisundet Bridge — Norway

The mainland of the Romsdal peninsula and the small island of Averya are connected by the Storseisundet Bridge, which is situated in Norway. Cantilevers, large constructions that expanded out horizontally yet are only supported at one end, were used to build this distinctive bridge.

Storseisundet Bridge — Norway

Storseisundet Bridge — Norway

850 feet are covered by the Storseisundet Bridge. It rises 75 feet above the water at its highest point. Due to the region’s erratic weather and frequent hurricanes, it took six years to complete the bridge.

Root Bridges — India

The fact that these Indian bridges were entirely built by nature is their coolest feature. In the southern Khasi and Jaintia hills, the Ficus elastica tree grows a network of backup roots that extend outward from higher up on the trunk.

Root Bridges — India

Root Bridges — India

Native tribes such as the War-Khasis and the War-Jaintias eventually developed the skills necessary to control the root growth of the trees and construct these magnificent bridges as well as pathways over rivers and throughout the forest.

Seven Mile Bridge — Florida

As you might have guessed, this bridge, which connects Knight’s Key in Marathon, Florida, to the Lower Keys, is close to seven miles long. The Seven Mile Bridge, which at the time of its construction was among the longest in the world, may not initially appear to be dangerous.

Seven Mile Bridge — Florida

Seven Mile Bridge — Florida

However, once you take into account the inescapable hurricanes that Florida experiences every year, you’ll see why this bridge is one of the most hazardous in the country.

Montenegro Rainforest Bridge — Costa Rica

On your next vacation, you might want to think about going to Costa Rica’s Sky Walk if you used to enjoy climbing trees. You are able to walk through the Monteverde rainforest’s treetops thanks to this extensive network of footbridges.

Montenegro Rainforest Bridge — Costa Rica

Montenegro Rainforest Bridge — Costa Rica

Visitors have the chance to view what is located in the upper levels of the jungle from the six suspension bridges, which span a combined total of 984 feet. Just remember to apply plenty of insect repellent and be cautious of snakes!

Taman Negara Canopy Walkway — Malaysia

According to some estimates, the Taman Negara canopy walkway in Malaysia is the longest suspension footbridge of its kind in the entire world. This bridge, which stretches for more than 1,700 feet and rises more than 130 feet above the forest floor, has emerged as a spectacle and a must-visit location for tourists from all over the world.

Taman Negara Canopy Walkway — Malaysia

Taman Negara Canopy Walkway — Malaysia

If you want to cross this footbridge all the way to the other side, you’ll need some seriously steely nerves. Never look down, no matter what you do!

Keshwa Chaca Bridge — Peru

The Keshwa Chaca Bridge has held up well since it was built by the Incas more than 500 years ago, despite the fact that most people probably wouldn’t have faith in a bridge made of woven grass. This bridge’s construction was truly a team effort.

Keshwa Chaca Bridge — Peru

Keshwa Chaca Bridge — Peru

The men used the small, thin ropes that the Incan women had first braided to make the large support cables. Even though it has withstood the test of time, the Keshwa Chaca Bridge is the last surviving example of Incan engineering.

The Pontchartrain Causeway — Louisiana

You will sooner or later be back on land if you ever find yourself driving on the Pontchartrain Causeway in Southern Louisiana. Please note that this bridge is nearly 24 miles long, so make sure you have plenty of gas in your tank.

The Pontchartrain Causeway — Louisiana

The Pontchartrain Causeway — Louisiana

Remember that when drivers are in the middle of this bridge, they cannot see land in either direction, despite the fact that it might not appear to be as intimidating in photographs. Avoid the Pontchartrain Causeway if you’re afraid of large bodies of water!

Kakum Canopy Walkway — Ghana

In Ghana’s central Kakum National Park, there is a vast network of hanging bridges. The Kakum Canopy Walkway’s bridges can be found 160 feet above the jungle floor.

Kakum Canopy Walkway — Ghana

Kakum Canopy Walkway — Ghana

These bridges are incredibly frightful to cross, even with the security net!

Aiguille Du Midi Bridge — France

You could say that the French Aiguille du Midi Bridge is caught in an extremely difficult situation. This small bridge, which is 12,605 feet above sea level, has been known to make visitors’ hearts race if they decide to look down.

Aiguille Du Midi Bridge — France

Aiguille Du Midi Bridge — France

Travelers must ride a 20-minute cable car up 9,200 vertical feet to reach the picturesque and precariously situated man-made structure known as the Aiguille du Midi Bridge.

Monkey Bridges — Vietnam

Known as “monkey bridges,” these handcrafted bamboo passageways are common in Vietnam. The Mekong Delta as well as the Red River Delta are significantly affected by them. Guests and tourists are generally horrified at the idea of stepping foot on these primitive structures, while some locals have no trouble navigating monkey bridges, which frequently lack any sort of handrails.

Monkey Bridges — Vietnam

Monkey Bridges — Vietnam

Locals in Vietnam commonly cross monkey bridges while lugging up to 50 kilograms of supplies on their backs.

Longjiang Suspension Bridge — China

The Long River Bridge, also known as the Longjiang Suspension Bridge, is situated outside of Baoshan in Yunnan, China. The Longjiang Bridge serves as one of the longest and tallest bridges ever constructed, spanning a distance of more than 3,900 feet and rising 920 feet above the Long River.

Longjiang Suspension Bridge — China

Longjiang Suspension Bridge — China

The Longjiang Bridge, a relatively recent creation, was completed in 2016. Before the construction of this enormous bridge, getting from Baoshan to Tengchong required a very inconvenient 8.4-mile detour.

Capilano Suspension Bridge — Canada

The Capilano Suspension Bridge, a pedestrian walking bridge, is located high above the Capilano River in Northern Vancouver and receives more than 800,000 visitors annually. The straightforward suspension bridge is 230 feet above the water and 460 feet long.

Capilano Suspension Bridge — Canada

Capilano Suspension Bridge — Canada

George Grant Mackay, a Scottish civil engineer, built the bridge for the first time in 1889. Henri Auveneau eventually acquired the bridge after it was twice sold, and in the middle of the 1950s, he made the decision to completely renovate the building.

Iya Kazurabashi Bridge — Japan

In Tokushima, Japan, you can discover the majestic vine bridges of the Iya Valley, which occurred in the late all the way back to the 12th century, high above the Iya-gawa River. The Iya Kazurabashi Bridge, a frightening and shaky structure constructed from wooden planks linked with mountain vines weaved together for added strength, is one of these unusual footbridges.

Iya Kazurabashi Bridge — Japan

Iya Kazurabashi Bridge — Japan

If you want an adrenaline rush, cross the bridge; if you’re feeling brave, cross the bridge without grabbing a handrail. Be mindful of your step, though!

Deception Pass Bridge — Washington

Deception Pass Bridge, which connects Whidbey Island as well as Fidalgo Island in the state of Washington, is actually made up of two separate two-lane bridges. Deception Pass Bridge spans nearly 1,500 feet, rising about 180 feet above Oak Harbor’s water.

Deception Pass Bridge — Washington

Deception Pass Bridge — Washington

Amazingly, the bridge’s spans cost more to paint in 1983 than they did to construct in 1935. This bridge is a national landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places in addition to being an impressive example of human engineering prowess.

Ai Petri Bridge — Ukraine

This terrifying footbridge, which spans a canyon 4,200 feet deep, can be found high in the Ukrainian mountains, a popular destination for thrill-seekers and mountaineers. The peaks of the Crimean Mountains are connected by the Ai Petri bridge.

Ai Petri Bridge — Ukraine

Ai Petri Bridge — Ukraine

The extreme amounts of wind and fog that the area frequently experiences are what make this bridge particularly risky. Tourists can feel the bridge rocked back and forth as it crosses over the massive canyon, even on days that are generally calm.

Eshima Ohashi Bridge — Japan

If you’ve ever visited an amusement park like Six Flags, you’re probably more familiar with that tense, suspenseful feeling as a rollercoaster gradually reaches the drop-off point, accompanied by the terrifying experience of falling over the edge.

Eshima Ohashi Bridge — Japan

Eshima Ohashi Bridge — Japan

When you cross Western Japan’s Eshima Ohashi Bridge, you will definitely feel that. This two-lane bridge spans Lake Najaumi for about a mile, rising quickly with a 6.1 percent gradient to allow ships to pass underneath the road.

Baliem River Bridge — Western New Guinea

Western New Guinea’s Baliem Valley is home to this bridge. If you’re not interested in swimming in the choppy waters and foaming rapids of the Baliem River, we do not recommend crossing this improvised bridge.

Baliem River Bridge — Western New Guinea

Baliem River Bridge — Western New Guinea

We can see that whoever built this bridge adhered to the same fundamental principles that expert engineering firms employ, but we’re not so sure it’s safe to trust in their peculiar and rudimentary use of building materials.

Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge — China

China’s Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge is an observation deck bridge. This glass-bottomed, totally transparent bridge was constructed as a tourist attraction. This was the world’s longest as well as tallest glass-bottomed bridge when it first started opening.

Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge — China

Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge — China

13 days after it first opened, the government announced that it would be closing the bridge due to an excessive amount of tourist traffic. The bridge was built by Israeli architect Haim Dotan to accommodate up to 800 visitors at once, but it was drawing 80,000 people per day, which was thrilling but dangerous!

South Tongass Highway — Alaska

In Ketchikan in Gateway County of Alaska, the South Tongass Highway crosses Hoadley Creek. This freeway was constructed in 1957, but it’s still holding up quite well. But unfortunately, appearances can be deceptive.

South Tongass Highway — Alaska

South Tongass Highway — Alaska

It is not surprising that this highway is deemed structurally deficient given the 15,147 daily crossings. A key component of 155 of the state’s 1,592 bridges has been deemed structurally deficient, meaning it is in fair or worse condition. This highway needs about $148.7 million in repairs.

Marienbrucke — Germany

Germany is home to the Marienbrucke, also referred to as “Queen Mary’s Bridge.” The most dangerous bridge in the world is located right here, a popular tourist destination. The Marienbrucke, which is close to the Bavarian Alps, was constructed to join two cliffs.

Marienbrucke — Germany

Marienbrucke — Germany

It is a magnificent but perilous bridge that spans the Pöllat River 295 feet above, providing unrivaled views of Neuschwanstein Castle. The Marienbrucke can become extremely congested and dangerous because it is a popular tourist destination.

Pai Memorial Bridge — Thailand

In the Mae Hong Son Province of northern Thailand, close to the Myanmar border, stands the Pai Memorial Bridge, a historical landmark. The bridge, which was initially made of iron, was actually constructed by Japanese soldiers in 1942 to cross the Pai River during World War II.

Pai Memorial Bridge — Thailand

Pai Memorial Bridge — Thailand

They forced the villagers to work while dragging trees from the jungles on elephants. The soldiers abandoned the bridge after the war and set it on fire. Villagers who regularly crossed the wooden bridge over the Pai River experienced difficulties as a result, and it was once more rebuilt.

Linyanti River Bridge — Namibia

The Mamili National Park, more particularly the northeastern corner of the Zambezi Region in Northern Namibia, is where the Linyanti River Bridge is situated. The Linyanti River Bridge is about 131 feet long. It is regarded as one of the most magnificent bridges in the entire world.

Linyanti River Bridge — Namibia

Linyanti River Bridge — Namibia

We believe it is safe to say that this bridge is quite dangerous because, while it accomplishes the job of transporting you from one side to the other, it is essentially just some iron planks over terrifying mud and deep water.

Plank Road in the Sky — China

That hardly qualifies as a bridge when you have only placed a few wooden planks along the cliff’s edge. These Chinese locals, however, who reside in and around Mount Hua’s summit, don’t seem too concerned.

Plank Road In The Sky — China

Plank Road In The Sky — China

These people have no difficulty putting up some wooden planks and using them as improvised bridges even though they are 7,000 feet above sea level. You must fasten yourself to a harness that is attached to a chain by a rope in order to cross. Although the view is undeniably beautiful, is the risk really worth it?

Puente de Ojuela — Mexico

The goldmine with the same name and the Ojuela bridge, also widely recognized as the Mapimi, are both situated in the Mexico’s state of Durango. The bridge is now used by pedestrians, whereas miners once used it for work-related purposes.

Puente De Ojuela — Mexico

Puente De Ojuela — Mexico

To attempt to drive a car over it, however, would be insane because the bridge is simply too thin to support that much weight. The Ojuela bridge, which was first built in 1898, is now one of the most significant tourist destinations in the region.

Captain William Moore Bridge — Alaska

The Captain William Moore bridge is undoubtedly one of the most hazardous bridges in Alaska, despite the fact that there are many other risky ones as well. Captain William Moore, which is close to Skagway and is part of the Klondike Highway, was built in 1976 to make it easier for motorists to cross Moore Creek Gorge.

Captain William Moore Bridge — Alaska

Captain William Moore Bridge — Alaska

However, due to heavy use by big trucks, the bridge has significantly deteriorated recently.

Mackinac Bridge — Michigan

This bridge isn’t referred to as the “Big Mac” for nothing. The Mackinac Bridge, which connects the lower and the upper peninsulas of Michigan State, was finished in 1957 and is a magnificent sight to behold because it spans a “whopping” 26,372 feet.

Mackinac Bridge — Michigan

Mackinac Bridge — Michigan

Even though it would seem to be fairly safe, the Mackinac has indeed been known to send some cars to their deaths. Today, the bridge is a real tourist attraction. There’s always the ferry, which has turned out to be much safer.

Borovsko Bridge — Czech Republic

The Borovsko Bridge can be found in the Czech Republic city of Borovnice, which is part of the Beneov District and Central Bohemian Region. This highway bridge, also known as the Czech Avignon, was built in 1939, just before World War II officially began.

Borovsko Bridge — Czech Republic

Borovsko Bridge — Czech Republic

In 1950, this 328-foot bridge was finally completed. However, it was also at that time that the bridge’s construction was halted and abandoned. The drinking water reservoir, constructed in 1976, later flooded it. Due to the bridge’s extreme danger, all vehicles are strictly prohibited.